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October 14, 2015

Forecasting Heaven

by Dave Malnes

In a world clamoring for information, a reliable source is a valuable commodity.

The source we choose will dictate the most important path our life can take… eternal life.

Important decisions are often based on forecasts.

A local weatherman predicts rain for the weekend and plans are changed.

A stock broker predicts a bull market and we invest more funds.

Politicians forecast a better future and we vote for them.

A prominent ministry leader predicts the world will end on a certain date, and the world mocks when nothing happens.

Sometimes weather forecasts turn out to be wrong and our weekend plans are changed. Sometimes money managers make wrong forecasts and investors lose money.

But what about eternity?

The world today needs prophets who are unafraid to share a reliable forecast on what matters the most – a soul’s eternal destiny.

Who can you trust?

With eternity at stake, absolute reliability is essential. But the majority of the world seems to be comfortable taking their chances on unreliable information that the world approves.

Forecasting heaven is humanly impossible. Nobody is capable of judging human hearts and Christians are wrong to even try.

And sometimes Christians don’t help by judging anyway.

To judge a human heart can mean telling a person they are heading to hell. Judging hearts can also mean to refrain from sharing the gospel at all.

Jesus tells us that the gates are wide and the road is broad for those who are walking towards eternal destruction. And that should be a concern for all people.

Jesus warns us of false teachers – those who misrepresent Christ and teach things that tickle human ears and registers with our human pride. People are naturally prone to messages that tell us that we can somehow be righteous enough on our own.

It is human pride that prompts us to walk on the wide and popular road that leads to eternal destruction. And God uses prophets to help break that pride through the power of God’s message, and help lead lost souls through the short gate and narrow road that leads to eternal life in heaven.

What do prophets look like today?

They do not wear long hooded robes and predict that the end is near, nor do they predict the second coming of Christ based on current events. Prophets are believers in Christ who specifically point to the promises God has given us in His Word.

Just like the Old Testament, God uses prophets to remind people that the Lord is reliable, He keeps promises, and you can take Him at His Word. Like a seasoned meteorologist forecasting a severe storm, God’s love and concern prompts Him to send repeated messages of severe warning amidst life’s distractions.

It seems that most people make decisions about their eternal future based on unreliable information. Even though the only way to believe is through the power of the Holy Spirit, people are rejecting God’s promises because they have don’t have time to hear God’s Word. People are too caught up in this world to seriously consider their eternal destiny.

The role of the evangelist is simply being God’s messenger – to tap a person on the shoulder and ask them to briefly consider an invitation to come to a banquet to taste and see that the Lord is good.

God is calling on prophets today to share the most reliable, purest information that comes from a perfect source – His Word.

It’s the most important forecast a person can hear.

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